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pizza

Wouldn’t Want to Miss This

Two slices of deep-dish pizza, nestled in a baggie, dangled from my mailbox.  My friend had brought me lunch.

What extraordinary, out-of-the-box delivery service!

Just like so many people I know. Extraordinary. Out-of-the-box. I find that I especially gravitate toward friends with some specific qualities:

  • Humor. I tend to be way too serious. Always pondering the meaning of life and the universe. I depend on John for his good humor and lighter perspective. And also on my pizza-hanging friend and others who open my eyes to the silly side of life.
  • Challenge. I can get stuck. Stuck on myself. Stuck in a specific way to do life. Stuck in the past. Stuck in worry. I have several wise friends who speak honest words to me: “I would love to see you.  . . .”
  • Wisdom.  Sometimes I simply feel inadequate. Can’t figure out this social media stuff—blogging, posting, pinning, tweeting. Oh, my! Can’t figure out how to navigate quiet spaces. Can’t figure out how to navigate empty nest. And then I ask a wise friend, “What did you do when . . . ?” My friends speak truth to me from their experience, and they also speak truth to me from their faith in God and their love of his words as written in the Bible.

What about you? What draws you into friendship?

And thank you, wise friends, for joining this ongoing conversation.

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image-help

“Help! Help Me!”

One afternoon a few months ago, I stopped at our local grocery store to pick up a few items. As I left my car to head for the front door, I heard a woman’s voice shouting, “Help! Help me!” I looked around frantically and could not see the person attached to the voice. She shouted again, “Help! I’m by the car! Help!” By this time another shopper had located the woman in distress, and we both ran to her aid.

As we helped her stand, she explained, “I have cancer. I am so weak that I fell trying to get into the car.”

I wonder if when she fell to the ground, she lay for a few minutes and started an internal dialogue. I would have. Should I just lie here until my daughter comes back? Really, I am okay. I’m just weak. And is it safe to ask for help from random strangers?

As I think back to this event, I so admire this woman. She was down and out—literally—and had the courage to own it and say that four-letter word we women so struggle to say: “Help!” I want to be this kind of woman.

What about you?